A grave for fallen comrades

A grave for fallen comrades

A German panzer crewman stands over the grave of two fallen panzer crewmen – potentially from the Panzer I in the background.

Most likely this photo is taken in 1941 during Operation Barbarossa, as the black panzer beret – the schutzmütze – was phased out and production had ceased in 1941, however it continued to be worn after that date for a while.  The surviving crewman is wearing the newer style of panzer crew headgear which was introduced in early 1940.

Captured Soviet soldier dressed in SN-42 body armor – 1944

Captured Soviet soldier dressed in SN-42 body armor – 1944

Stalnoi Nagrudnik – the steel bib, designed to stop the 9mm pistol round and potentially even a round from a rifle as long as it did not hit directly front on.

In this photo three non-penetrating bullets have hit the front of the vest and have been successfully stopped, saving this young soldiers life.

“A date that will live in infamy” – Dec 7th 1941

“A date that will live in infamy” – Dec 7th 1941

uss arizona burns during pearl harbor attack
The USS Arizona burns during the attack on Pearl Harbor

A double post today – It’s the 8th down here in NZ but for our American readers it is the 7th.

american flags at half staff

“The attack commenced at 7:48 a.m. Hawaiian Time. The base was attacked by 353 Imperial Japanese fighter planes, bombers, and torpedo planes in two waves, launched from six aircraft carriers. All eight U.S. Navy battleships were damaged, with four sunk. All but the USS Arizona (BB-39) were later raised, and six were returned to service and went on to fight in the war. The Japanese also sank or damaged three cruisers, three destroyers, an anti-aircraft training ship, and one minelayer. 188 U.S. aircraft were destroyed; 2,403 Americans were killed and 1,178 others were wounded. Important base installations such as the power station, shipyard, maintenance, and fuel and torpedo storage facilities, as well as the submarine piers and headquarters building (also home of the intelligence section) were not attacked. Japanese losses were light: 29 aircraft and five midget submarines lost, and 64 servicemen killed. One Japanese sailor, Kazuo Sakamaki, was captured.


The attack came as a profound shock to the American people and led directly to the American entry into World War II in both the Pacific and European theaters. The following day, December 8, the United States declared war on Japan. Domestic support for non-interventionism, which had been fading since the Fall of France in 1940, disappeared. Clandestine support of the United Kingdom (e.g., the Neutrality Patrol) was replaced by active alliance. Subsequent operations by the U.S. prompted Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy to declare war on the U.S. on December 11, which was reciprocated by the U.S. the same day.


There were numerous historical precedents for unannounced military action by Japan. However, the lack of any formal warning, particularly while negotiations were still apparently ongoing, led President Franklin D. Roosevelt to proclaim December 7, 1941, “a date which will live in infamy”. Because the attack happened without a declaration of war and without explicit warning, the attack on Pearl Harbor was judged by the Tokyo Trials to be a war crime.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attack_on_Pearl_Harbor

Operation Overlord – 6/6/44

Operation Overlord – 6/6/44

Depending on where you are in the world, today is either the 73rd anniversary of D-Day, or it’s the day before D-Day.

It’s the day when the Allied forces returned to mainland Europe, many soliders on both sides lost their lives on this day, and in the many days to come.

Into the jaws of death, US infantry disembark landing craft at Omaha.

82nd Airborne and French Resistance discussing the situation during the Battle for Normandy.

British troops taking cover while waiting to move off ‘Queen White’ beach, Sword Area.

A LCM landing craft evacuates casualties from the D-Day invasion beaches.

Hopefully you enjoyed this daily historical photo series, as we come to some of the more momentous days in WWII history we will do more series like this.